HISTORY British Colonial Policies and Implications for Mamprusi-Kusasi Relations

British Colonial Policies and Implications for Mamprusi-Kusasi Relations

-

The genesis of the Mamprusi-Kusasi ethnic conflict in Bawku has been traced to the British colonial policy in the Northern Territories (coterminous with present day Northern Ghana). In the first place, the Colonial Administration inherited a structure in which land was vested in the hands of chiefs who held it in trust for their subjects. This made land a very valuable commodity especially as its value appreciated with time.

Furthermore, the restructuring of traditional institutions in Northern Ghana by the British Colonial Administration prior to the introduction of the indirect rule system in 1932 which took the form of amalgamating smaller/acephalous ethnic groups with bigger/centralized kingdoms, termed paramountcies and headed by paramount chiefs, eventually created subordinate-master relationship between the bigger states and the smaller non-centralized polities. For example, the amalgamation of the Kusasi and Mamprusi in 1932 created a subordinate/master relationship between the two as the Kusasi were subsumed under the Mamprusi (Ladouceur 1979 & Lund, 2003). The determination by the Mamprusi to maintain this colonial arrangement even after the exit of the British set the stage for persistent tensions that could escalateinto conflict.

Other events immediately before and after Ghana’s independence also pushed the two groups to the point of violent confrontations/clashes. For instance, the emergence of an educated Kusasi elite and the formation of the Kusasi Youth Movement whose agenda among other things was to press for a reform of the traditional governance structure, further heightened the uneasiness within the ranks of the Mamprusi royal elite.

From its formation in 1954, the movement used its meetings as a platform to highlight the plight of the Kusasi, especially after 1932,3 as a politically and socially marginalized group, in order to galvanize Kusasi ethnic solidarity against the perceived enemy, the Mamprusi.

The emergence of party politics in the early 1950s and the posturing of the Kusasi and Mamprusi deepened the polarization of the Bawku community. Whilst the Mamprusi, with the influence of the Nayiri (Mamprugu overlord), supported the Northern People’s Party (NPP) which was seen as a chiefs party, the Kusasi guided by their mostly urban educated elite and influenced by Kwame Nkrumah’s ideas of liberation, threw their weight behind the Convention People’s Party(CPP).

Source: (Mamprusi-Kusasi Imbroglio; 1902-2000: )
ijird.com

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Latest news

30 History’s Greatest Black Achievers: Black power (Part 2)

From Martin Luther King Jnr in the USA to Nelson Mandela in South Africa, history is never complete without such names popping up. Today we are going to look at the part 1 of our compilation of History's greatest black achievers.

30 History’s Greatest Black Achievers: Black power (Part 1)

From Malcolm X in the USA to Nkrumah in Ghana, history is never complete without such names popping up. Today we are going to look at the part 1 of our compilation of History's greatest black achievers

The fearless Botswana leader who stood up against Paul Kruger in the 1860s and refused to let his people do unpaid labor

Kgamanyane Pilane was born in the 1820s in Pilanesberg, near present-day Rustenburg among the Bakgatla-ba-Kgafela people of the North-West...

Grace Ogot: One Of The Africa`S Finest Writers And The First Woman To Publish Novel In East Africa

Grace Emily Ogot (née Akinyi; 15 May 1930 – 18 March 2015) was a Kenyan author, nurse, journalist, politician and diplomat. Together...

The Tragic Yet Resilient Story Of Igbo Slaves Who Committed Mass Suicide Off U.S. Coast In 1803

The stories of slave resistance, many of us know, have to do with bloodshed, violence, and destruction. But there...

The Reign Of Nana Osei Tutu I

UNITED ASANTE STATES UNDER NANA OSEI TUTU  ( 1695 –  1719 )                  Nana...

Must read

30 History’s Greatest Black Achievers: Black power (Part 2)

From Martin Luther King Jnr in the USA to Nelson Mandela in South Africa, history is never complete without such names popping up. Today we are going to look at the part 1 of our compilation of History's greatest black achievers.

30 History’s Greatest Black Achievers: Black power (Part 1)

From Malcolm X in the USA to Nkrumah in Ghana, history is never complete without such names popping up. Today we are going to look at the part 1 of our compilation of History's greatest black achievers

You might also likeRELATED
Recommended to you